Malvasia – attività all’aperto


IN THE OPEN AIR

The area around Bosa, where nature is still intact, is worth discovering actively. Bike or horse rides along the path from Bosa to Alghero are specially recommended. This takes the visitor into the wildest, most authentic part of the area passing through giant’s graves and nuraghe, deserted beaches and pools, and expanses of cork, holm oak and juniper.

Hikers and birdwatchers can certainly opt for a visit to the Capo Marrargiu Bio-marine Park and Badde Aggiosu and Monte Mannu Nature Reserve. A few kilometres to the north of Bosa, the coast formed geologically of grey tufa and the better-known red trachyte makes this landscape barren and inaccessible, the ideal place for griffons to nest. This splendid bird of prey reigns exclusively in these areas. The gliding flight and aerial evolutions of the Sardinian vulture over the trachyte butts and cliffs overlooking the sea can be seen through the dense scrub of mastic, cistus and broom and the shade of a cork wood. The canoe trip in the valley of the River Temo, the only navigable river in Sardinia, is a unique experience. Leaving the residential area of Bosa, skirting the beautiful ‘gardens’, there are rocks, cliffs, gullies and natural pools where there is a forest of centuries-old cork trees.

People who prefer a relaxed approach to nature while keeping their eyes open can choose a trip in the little green train which passes through the farmland of Bosa taking the traveller through fantastic glimpses to breathtaking views. The railway line of the little green train is the old line that connected Macomer with Bosa, inaugurated on 26 December 1888. After various ups and downs, it was closed in 1990, re-opening as a tourist line in 1995.
The line winds from the sea to the plateau through the wide Modolo valley, lets the visitor come into contact with some peculiar historical-cultural aspects of the area – from the luxuriant green of the Malvasia vineyards to the fascinating ruins of the Cistercian abbey of S. Maria di Corte, and the mysterious charm of the Succuronis nuraghe.

SARDINIA VINES